Butternut Squash Soup with Benedictine Brandy

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I made this soup recently, and Mr Misky loved it. He said “YUM!” Then a few weeks later I served it as a starter for dinner guests. They thought it was delicious, and it is so easy to make that it was a total win-win soup as far as I’m concerned. It keeps very well in the fridge for a few days, so you can make it ahead of time, and warm it up when needed. It also freezes well – leave enough room in the container so when it freezes there’s space for the soup to expand. You don’t want your soup blown’ its top in the freezer!

If you make this soup, let me know how you get on with it because I think it’s one of the best recipes for butternut squash soup that I’ve found in a long time.

Butternut Squash Soup with Benedictine Brandy

Ingredients (Serves 4-6)

2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 large leek, white and light green part only, chopped (about 1 cup)
1 x 3-to-4-pound butternut squash, peeled and cubed
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
Salt to taste (1/2 tsp)
3 tablespoons Benedictine Brandy (or Sherry)
500ml/2-3 cups chicken stock
250 ml/1 cup milk (or crème fraîche cut with water)
2 tablespoons heavy cream, or crème fraîche plus more for serving

Method:

1.  Melt the butter in a large stockpot over medium-low heat. Add the leek and cook, stirring with a wooden spoon, until softened—this should take about 5 minutes (if leek starts to brown, add a tablespoon or so of water).

2. Add the squash, nutmeg, pepper and 1/2 teaspoon salt and continue to cook for another 5 minutes, stirring frequently.

3. Add the brandy/sherry and cook for a couple of minutes to reduce, then add enough chicken stock just to cover the squash (if you have added all of the stock and still need more liquid, add some water).

4. Increase the heat to high and bring the soup to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer, partially covered, for about 20 minutes, or until the squash is tender.

5. Using a blender or a food processor, blend the soup with the milk in several batches, adding more liquid if necessary.

6. Return to the pot and heat until just simmering. Taste and add more salt and pepper if necessary. Stir in another splash of sherry and the cream just before serving, adding a drizzle of cream to garnish each bowl if you like.

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7 Comments Add yours

  1. lizzygoodthings says:

    Love the sound of Benedictine Brandy in this soup!

    1. Misky says:

      It gives it surprising depth of flavour, too. It’s nice. Better than sherry IMO.

  2. Joanna says:

    It sounds delicious! I will definitely try the leek and squash combo, though I need to leave the milk/cream out for B (triggers asthma) so it probably wouldn’t come out quite the same. Must tackle the squash mountain this week, I think there are four now and a Swede or two begging to be used 🙂

  3. Joanna says:

    But as you say I could try it with creme fraiche, just went back and read it again! Trip to the shops is in order I think…. xxx

    1. Misky says:

      I added the crème fraiche bit for your benefit, knowing the dairy could cause problems. 🙂

  4. That would make a wonderful soup. I always have good sherry, so I would use that rather than Benedictine, which is a liqueur that i never have in stock. My parents used to drink B & B’s or Brandy and Benedictine at Christmas…..

    1. Misky says:

      The Benedictine was from a friend’s cabinet; they moved to Singapore, which I suspect was the only way they could rid themselves of that bottle. My Mr thinks that the Benedictine adds depth that the sherry didn’t. Perhaps he just doesn’t want me using the good stuff for cooking, but I figure if it’s good enough to drink then it’s good enough to cook with. 🙂

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