Frikadelle–Danish Meatballs

This is Mr Misk’s speciality. He excels at making these, and I continue to reinforce this point so that making frikadelle (frikg-ah-del-lah)remains his signature dish rather than mine. It’s not terribly time consuming or difficult but it is, or rather can be, messy. Fluids flinging across the worktop in gooey globs, puffs of flour adhering to cupboard doors and making the floor slick as ball bearings on steel. I tend to stay well out of the kitchen when Mr Misk cooks so that he can’t hear my exasperated huffs and snorts as my place of work turns into a food-fight-battlefield re-enactment. He always cleans up nicely after himself; everything sparkles and everything is put back in its place when he finishes. And best of all, he cooks frikadelle like a champ. These are good. Really.

A note: fry one frikadelle as a test so that you’re sure the seasonings are right. Add more salt or pepper if needed.

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Frikadelle – Danish Meatballs

Ingredients:
1 medium onion, finely diced
5 large eggs, beaten
500g minced beef
500g minced pork
1 cup plain flour
1 teaspoon fine salt
1 teaspoon white pepper
250-270ml soda water
splash of milk
butter or margarine for frying

Method:
Finely chop/dice one medium onion. This is a perfect opportunity to cry, if the mood calls you. Just blame those crocodile tears on the onions. When you’re finished crying, beat the five eggs in a small bowl, and set aside.

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Break the beef and pork into manageable chunks, and add to the bowl of a stand mixer (or a large bowl with your hand mixer plugged in and ready to go. This isn’t one to attempt by hand with a spoon). Now add the chopped onion and the beaten eggs to the meat, and start mixing at slow speed so you don’t cover yourself in meaty bits and beaten egg.

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Gradually add the flour, then the salt and white pepper. Mix well. Add half of the soda water, stand back and mix well on slow speed. Slowly add more soda water until the mixture looks fluffy and light and, at the risk of sounding like Nigella, voluminously voluptuous. Add a dash of milk, just a bit – like maybe 1/4 cup at most. Double-check your mixture to be sure it’s all mixed and the ingredients are thoroughly incorporated.

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Melt butter or margarine in a large frying pan. Now shape loosely formed balls of meat using two spoons, cupping, rocking and transferring the mixture between the two spoons.

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When you like the looks of its shape (sort of floppish-roundish-oval), put the ball into the frying pan and cook until browned and completely cooked through. Enjoy!

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12 Comments Add yours

  1. Joanna says:

    Wow! What does the soda water do ? it looks very exciting.

    On cooking with others : B is much tidier in the kitchen than me and we mostly cook side by side, with the odd cracked shin when someone opens or forgets to close a drawer 🙂 I love cooking with him and he loves cooking too.

    1. Misk Cooks says:

      The soda water makes them extreme light textured rather than dense as milk can do. It’s fizzy soda water that you need with lots of fizz. 🙂

      Peder likes cooking. He’s a messy genius, I guess I would say. Peder is always cracking his head on the extractor hood. He’s very tall, even by a tall person’s standard, so his poor old head gets a knocking frequently.

      1. Joanna says:

        We solved the head cracking problem when we did our kitchen (jeez sound like someone doing an advertorial, I’m so sorry!) with a De Dietrich fan,http://images.icecat.biz/img/norm/low/3958668-2042.jpg I think our model is discontinued now but I am sure there are similar on the market as it is a very good fan, and getting our plumber to make a special hole so it could vent to the outside for max efficiency. – poor Peder, my sympathies go out to him.

        1. Misk Cooks says:

          Oh! That is a brilliant design, and certainly Peder’s head would be safe. He said last night while we were watching that BBC Bake-off on telly … ‘maybe we should knock down some wall and make the kitchen bigger’. I nearly fainted from restrained excitement. I see this as a retirement project. 😀 Time will tell if it happens though.

  2. What, are you a mind reader? I just bought the ingredients for frikadeller and now I guess I’d better get cracking at it! Need to get a head of red cabbage, too . . . Oh, I’m hungry now!

    1. Misk Cooks says:

      We find it a bit of a challenge making ‘proper’ Danish-style red cabbage in the UK because you can’t buy the red currant juice like you can in DK. We always pack home bottles when we go to visit. 🙂 I hope you enjoy your frikadelle!

  3. “voluminously voluptuous” – love it!
    I’d never have thought to try soda water in meatballs, but as you say it would make them lighter and fluffier. I make a feta pie dish (Bulgarian in origin) that calls for soda water. It’s one of those magical ingredients 🙂

    1. Misk Cooks says:

      It does make me wonder what other recipes I could use soda water in. 🙂

  4. I’ve never seen meatballs made like this before! Thanks Misk, they look delicious!

    1. Misk Cooks says:

      Most people who eat them think so, too. 🙂

  5. Such a smooth mixture Misk, these sound lovely for dinner. I’ve seen soda water in meat balls recipes before but have never played with it.
    I’d eat these tonight wrapped up in a lettuce leaf and a dollop of chilli sauce on top 🙂

    1. Misk Cooks says:

      Low-carb, eh? Sounds delicious. 😀

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